?

Log in

No account? Create an account
A single sentence by Thucydides - Impressions and Expressions of Ijon
November 9th, 2004
09:27 pm

[Link]

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
A single sentence by Thucydides
Here is a single Greek sentence, composed by Thucydides. Who the hell taught this guy composition?


(click to zoom)

Current Mood: bewildered
Current Music: Keith Jarrett -- The Vienna Concert

(19 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments
 
[User Picture]
From:wildernesscat
Date:November 9th, 2004 07:41 pm (UTC)

(Link)
Yeah, right... whatever...
[User Picture]
From:lilacsinmarch
Date:November 9th, 2004 08:03 pm (UTC)
(Link)
They sure had long breaths back then.
[User Picture]
From:reneighssance
Date:November 9th, 2004 09:32 pm (UTC)

re: "They sure had long breaths back then"

(Link)
Yes. That's Greek lunguage.
[User Picture]
From:lilacsinmarch
Date:November 9th, 2004 10:40 pm (UTC)

Re: "They sure had long breaths back then"

(Link)
:)Just saying Hello and goodbye must have taken the whole day.
[User Picture]
From:bugel
Date:November 10th, 2004 02:15 am (UTC)

Commas

(Link)
Those commas in the text must be a modern addition to make it easier to parse it. I don't think they had those in Thucydides' days, so it must have been even harder.

Kalinixta!

[User Picture]
From:iod
Date:November 10th, 2004 11:56 am (UTC)

Re: Commas

(Link)
surely they had SOME form of punctuation. Even the bible had various types of commas, full-stops etc. Though I'm not sure at what point in history they were put there...
[User Picture]
From:mummimamma
Date:November 10th, 2004 01:29 pm (UTC)

Re: Commas

(Link)
Punctuation in classical times was more or less non existent, in most cases they didn't even separate the words. yestheywrotelikethis (even worse, only capitals)

Those manuscripts I've worked with (in Latin, from 950 & 1280) didn't have any punctuation at all, but the printed matter from the renaissance has, but I don't really know enough of the subject to be precise. (Which means I'll have to pick up a book on the subject next time I pass the library).

Or does anyone know more than me?
[User Picture]
From:ijon
Date:November 10th, 2004 05:09 pm (UTC)

Re: Commas

(Link)
see below.
[User Picture]
From:ijon
Date:November 10th, 2004 05:06 pm (UTC)

Re: Commas

(Link)
Quite right. Punctuation and lowercase letters were introduced to Greek by medieval scholars.

Naturally, adding punctuation is an act of interpretation, and different editions of the classical texts do vary in punctuation not infrequently, according to the editor's interpretation of the sentence.
[User Picture]
From:antinous
Date:November 10th, 2004 09:54 am (UTC)
(Link)
Дорогой, так дело не пойдет!
[User Picture]
From:mummimamma
Date:November 10th, 2004 01:39 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Come on, it looks impressive.

Think of it as some kind of mid-life crisis. Some people get a high speed car chariot, some a pretty new girlfriend, and some write long complicated sentences without logical stops that make them famous and frighten people for thousands of years. Or the editor went out of full stops.

Where is it from? (To lazy to bother to find out myself)
[User Picture]
From:ijon
Date:November 10th, 2004 05:09 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Hmm, interesting theory. I bet Thucydides would have gotten a tremendous kick out of knowing we still study his work. He certainly intended it as "a legacy for ages to come". I doubt he envisioned anyone but Greeks of ages to come would be reading this, but hey, life's strange and interesting...

This sentence comprises the entire second paragraph of book one, chapter nine.
[User Picture]
From:ygurvitz
Date:November 10th, 2004 07:56 pm (UTC)

I like him

(Link)
When you're writing the historical masterpiece of the next two and a half millenia, maintaining gravitas is a must. Yes, it is intimidating - but it's not written for hoi polloi. Gentlemen of leisure, such as exiled generals with loads of silver mines on their hands, have to time to read.
[User Picture]
From:ijon
Date:November 10th, 2004 08:03 pm (UTC)

Re: I like him

(Link)
Oh, definitely!

All kidding aside, it is a masterpiece. It endures the test of time like no other historical work I know. His insights are so sharp! He has truly captured some universal traits of the condition and psyche of human society.

To paraphrase Whitehead, all political and military historical events following Thucydides are footnotes to his grand history.
[User Picture]
From:reneighssance
Date:November 11th, 2004 02:22 am (UTC)

Re: Whitehead paraphrased

(Link)
Is it the narration of the events or the events that serve as mere footnotes?

Whitehead is known to have said that "all Western philosophy is but a footnote to Plato."
Do you have his original wording (that you paraphrased)?



[User Picture]
From:ijon
Date:November 11th, 2004 11:04 am (UTC)

Re: Whitehead paraphrased

(Link)
I did mean the events and not the narration, yes. The events, to an observer who's read Thucydides, must constantly remind key passages in his work.

Quite apart from that, it is probably also true that many historians since his time have followed in his footsteps, certainly in method, if not in style.
[User Picture]
From:ijon
Date:November 11th, 2004 11:06 am (UTC)

Re: Whitehead paraphrased

(Link)
Oh, and as for Whitehead -- I was paraphrasing from memory, of course, but looking it up now, I found: "The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato." attributed to Whitehead. No publication is listed, and it may be apocryphal, but it sure is well-known.
[User Picture]
From:ijon
Date:November 11th, 2004 11:02 pm (UTC)

Re: Whitehead paraphrased

(Link)
Ah! I misused the word paraphrase; there's the rub. What I meant was that I am borrowing the form of Whitehead's famous quip, for my content. I did not mean Whitehead discussed Thucydides. I really mischose the principal verb.
[User Picture]
From:reneighssance
Date:November 12th, 2004 01:42 pm (UTC)

Re: rub

(Link)
"...ay, there's the rub." -- Hamlet
Project Ben-Yehuda [Hebrew] Powered by LiveJournal.com