Asaf Bartov (ijon) wrote,
Asaf Bartov
ijon

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Material details

In a recent post, I gave a list of books I purchased at Barnes & Noble, but forgot to include the list of music CDs purchased at the same time (their cost was included in the hideous total I mentioned there). Also, in my last post, about the San Francisco foray, I mentioned buying books at City Lights, and I might as well list them too. Here, then, are the lists, if you're interested.



Music



The Glenn Gould Edition [Sony] -- Gould conducting Wagner (his last recording); Gould playing a piano version of some Wagner pieces.

Mozart -- Great Choral Works [Philips] -- Great Mass in C minor K427; Coronation Mass in C K317; Requiem in D minor K626. Sir Colin Davis and the London Symphony Orchestra & Chorus; BBC Symphony Orchestra; John Alldis Choir.

Paganini -- 24 Caprices [EMI] -- Caprices op.1; Itzhak Perlman, solo violin.

Richard Strauss -- Salome [Philips] -- Salome (opera); State orchestra of Dresden, Seiji Ozawa. (this opera is based on Oscar Wilde's play Salome. Read it if you haven't yet. On second thought, read it again if you have.)

Mozart -- Requiem [Deutsche Grammophon] -- Herbert von Karajan and the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra (yes, I collect performances of Mozart's Requiem).

Mendelssohn -- Lieder ohne Worte [Deutsche Grammophon] -- op.19, 30, 38, 53, 62, 67, 85, 102; Daniel Barenboim, solo piano. (the title means "Songs Without Words".)

Mahler -- Das Lied von der Erde [Sony] -- Leonard Bernstein and the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra; Christa Ludwig, Mezzo-Soprano; Rene Kollo, Tenor.

Brahms -- Ein Deutsches Requiem [Erato] -- op. 45; Daniel Barenboim and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

Schubert -- The Last Four Quartets [Philips] -- D. 810 "Death and the Maiden"; D. 804 "Rosamunde"; D. 887; D. 703 "Quartettsatz"; Quartetto Italiano.


Books

(from City Lights)

The Pound Era, by Hugh Kenner, University of California Press, 1971.

Modern Times, by Paul Johnson, Perennial Classics, 1991. (I read and appreciated Johnson's Intellectuals. More on that one some other time.)

Lectures on Literature, by Vladimir Nabokov, Harvest, 1980.

The Nibelungenlied, author unknown, A. T. Hatto (tr.), Penguin Classics, 1969.

Belief or Nonbelief? A Dialogue, by Umberto Eco and Cardinal Martini, Minna Proctor (tr.), Arcade Publishing, 2000.

The Legend of Pope Joan, by Peter Stanford, Berkley Books, 1999. (Popess Joan is a fascinating legend, especially suitable as role-playing material...)

The Albigensian Crusade, by Jonathan Sumption, Faber and Faber, 1978. (There's a running joke about the Albigensian Crusade with a good friend; couldn't resist...) (but it should be an interesting read, too, of course.)

The Origin of English Words: A Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, by Joseph T. Shipley, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984. (I'm such a sucker for word books...)

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, by Jared Diamond, W. W. Norton & Company, 1999. (M.'s F. recommended it most unreservedly, and I was so happy with M. and F., I decided to give it a shot. For what it's worth, the book won a Pulitzer Prize.)

The White Goddess, by Robert Graves, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1948. (wherein Graves singlehandedly founds New Age, albeit not quite on purpose.)

Malleus Maleficarum, Heinrich Kramer and James Sprenger, Rev. Montague Summers (tr.), Dover Publication, 1971. (The classic Christian text on Witchcraft and What To Do About It. Originally published in 1484.)

I think that's it. So now you know. By the way, you're all welcome to borrow any of these.
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