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Coca-Cola is Gesunt! - Impressions and Expressions of Ijon
December 21st, 2002
09:39 pm

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Coca-Cola is Gesunt!
Chaim from HebrewBooks.org contacted me about linking to his project from mine (Project Ben-Yehuda). I checked out his site, to see if it is indeed relevant for the BY project's link section, and discovered that it is a serious resource with religious Jewish texts written in America since the 19th century, available as Adobe PDF files. Among other things, it offers complete issues of several Jewish magazines, such as HaPardes (lit: "the orchard", a very meaningful term in Jewish mysticism, but also a pun on the editor's name), wherein I found the following gem:



They even showed him The Secret Ingredient!

Current Mood: amused
Current Music: Berry Sakharoff -- Blind Faith

(16 comments | Leave a comment)

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From:avva
Date:December 21st, 2002 08:47 am (UTC)

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In which issue?
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From:ijon
Date:December 21st, 2002 09:00 am (UTC)

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In the October 1933 issue, now linked from my entry.
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From:brad
Date:December 21st, 2002 10:55 am (UTC)

gesund

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Did you mean the German wort "gesund" (healthy), pronounced "gesunt", or is that from another language, and probably related?
From:(Anonymous)
Date:December 21st, 2002 11:26 am (UTC)

It's Yiddish

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It's Yiddish, the common "day-to-day" language of Ashkenazi (East and central European) jews. Since the language evolved in Germany, it owes a great deal of it's vocabulary to the German language (for example, 'Gesund' for 'healthy') as well as to Hebrew (the Jews' ritual language).

- Dotan

BTW, Ijon, this is throughly cool.
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From:fishberg
Date:December 21st, 2002 10:16 pm (UTC)

LOL!

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This is a good one.
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From:wildernesscat
Date:December 21st, 2002 11:30 pm (UTC)

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Am I seeing double, or does the Yiddish wording actually spell "Coco Cola"?!
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From:novartza
Date:December 22nd, 2002 11:10 am (UTC)

You aren't seeing double

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Sopme instances of the word spell "Coci-Cola," others "Coca-cola." It is probably a typo due to lack of competent proof-readers.
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From:goliard
Date:December 21st, 2002 11:56 pm (UTC)

Atlanta, Dzshardzshia

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Indeed a dzshem. :)
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From:passing
Date:December 24th, 2002 09:46 am (UTC)
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А почему это она КАКА кола? Вот ето самое "T" под алеф, насколько я помню, читается как А? И в этом тексте так же есть разница, посмотрите например на второе слово КОЛА, там первый алеф без "Т" , т.е. имеется в виду звук О, а второй специфически А.

Значит завод КАКА-КОЛЫ? Очень точно...Мудрость ашкеназских евреев всегда радовала:)
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From:ijon
Date:December 24th, 2002 10:31 am (UTC)

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Sorry, I don't understand Russian (yet!). But I'd love to read what you have to say, if you can say it in English or Hebrew.
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From:passing
Date:December 24th, 2002 10:41 am (UTC)
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Yeh, and writing in english would'of been a wholla lot easier on me:)

So looking at the way Coca-Cola is spelled in this ad, i wonder - why does it sound a lot more like "KAKA-KOLA". Look at the first two alephs, they have the "T" underneath (forgot what this nikud is called). This one usually denotes A sound nowadays. The second word has "T" under the last aleph and nothing under the first one, so they did know the difference and it is clearly meant to say "KOLA" there.
So it's KAKA-KOLA then?

Our ashkenasian forefathers were pretty darn precise when giving names to things...:)
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From:gianthare
Date:December 24th, 2002 08:55 pm (UTC)
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In Yiddish 'alef with kamaz' always denotes 'o'. For 'a', 'alef with patah' is used.
So it's Coco-Cola then.
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From:passing
Date:December 25th, 2002 05:20 am (UTC)

Re:

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Why do they use different "o" signs then for the first and the last word?
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From:gianthare
Date:December 25th, 2002 05:27 am (UTC)
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Typo. (And possibly, alef without any sign also denotes 'o', but I am not sure about this one).
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From:amddiffynfa
Date:December 27th, 2002 10:42 am (UTC)

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No typos here.

Aleph with kamatz is "o" in Yiddish AND in Ashkenasic Hebrew, it is a rule. Just so. Remember the old song "afn pripechek"?

....
Zogt zhe noch a mol un take noch a mol:
KOmetz-Aleph - "O"
....

And the 2nd aleph, without diacritics, it's for the English "a" in "Coca" which is not the Russian "A" in "KOKA" but rather some "undecided" sound like the 1st and 2nd "o" in modern Russian "moloko".

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From:avva
Date:December 24th, 2002 04:47 pm (UTC)

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Ahem. New plan: I keep sending Russian LJ-users to your journal, they'll write comments in Russian and your curiousity will take you by throat and force you to learn Russian.
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